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Category: react

Sketching in the Browser

Mark Dalgleish details how his team at seek tried to build a library of React components that could then be translated into Sketch documents. Why is that important though? Well, Mark describes the problems that his team faced like this: …most design systems still have a fundamental flaw. Designers and developers continue to work in entirely different mediums. As a result, without constant, manual effort to keep them in sync, our code and design assets are constantly drifting further and further apart. For companies working with design systems, it seems our industry is stuck with design tools that are essentially built for the wrong medium—completely unable to feed our development work back into the next round of design. Mark then describes how his team went ahead and open-sourced html-sketchapp-cli, a command line tool for converting HTML documents into Sketch components. The idea is that this will ultimately save everyone from having to effectively copy and paste styles from the React components back to Sketch and vice-versa. Looks like this is the second major stab at the React to Sketch. The last one that went around was AirBnB’s React Sketch.app. We normally think of the end result of design tooling being the code, so it’s fascinating to see people finding newfound value in moving the other direction. Direct Link to Article — Permalink Sketching in the Browser is a post...

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How Would You Solve This Rendering Puzzle In React?

Welcome, React aficionados and amateurs like myself! I have a puzzle for you today. Let’s say that you wanted to render out a list of items in a 2 column structure. Each of these items is a separate component. For example, say we had a list of albums and we wanted to render them a full page 2 column list. Each “Album” is a React component. Scroll rendering problem Now assume the CSS framework that you are using requires you to render out a two column layout like this… Column 1 Column 2 This means that in order to...

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WordPress + React

I posted just 2 months ago about Foxhound and how I found it pretty cool, but also curious that it was one of very few themes around that combine the WordPress JSON API and React, even though they seem like a perfect natural fit. Like a headless CMS, almost. Since then, a few more things have crossed my desk of people doing more with this idea and combination. Maxime Laboissonniere wrote Strapping React.js on a WordPress Backend: WP REST API Example: I’ll use WordPress as a backend, and WordPress REST API to feed data into a simple React e-commerce SPA: Creating products with the WP Advanced Custom Fields plugin Mapping custom fields to JSON payload Consuming the JSON REST API with React Rendering products in our store Perhaps more directly usable, Postlight have put out a Starter Kit. Gina Trapani: People who publish on the web love WordPress. Engineers love React. With some research, configuration, and trial and error, you can have both — but we’d like to save you the work. Here’s that repo. WordPress + React is a post from CSS-Tricks...

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Save 15% or More on Car Insurance by Switching to Plain JavaScript

Satire disclaimer: This article is as much satire as it is serious insight if there is even any of that at all. Don’t take it too seriously, but do tell all your friends. Also, the bit about Taco Bell is 100% true. I wouldn’t joke about something like that. My day usually begins like this: I wake up at 6:15 a.m. (kill me) to get the kids ready for school. They’re mad. I’m mad. Everyone is on the brink of an emotional breakdown because it’s 6:15 in the morning. Usually the first thing that I do when I wake up...

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Accessible Web Apps with React, TypeScript, and AllyJS

Accessibility is an aspect of web development that is often overlooked. I would argue that it is as vital as overall performance and code reusability. We justify our endless pursuit of better performance and responsive design by citing the users, but ultimately these pursuits are done with the user’s device in mind, not the user themselves and their potential disabilities or restrictions. A responsive app should be one that delivers its content based on the needs of the user, not only their device. Luckily, there are tools to help alleviate the learning curve of accessibility-minded development. For example, GitHub...

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