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The Three Types of Performance Testing

We’ve been covering performance quite a bit — not just recently, but throughout the course of the year. Now, Harry Roberts weighs in by identifying three types of ways performance can be tested. Of particular note is the first type of testing: The first kind of testing a team should carry out is Proactive testing: this is very intentional and deliberate, and is an active attempt to identify performance issues. This takes the form of developers assessing the performance impact of every piece of work they do as they’re doing it. The idea here is that we spot the problem before it becomes problematic. Prevention, after all, is cheaper than the cure. Capturing performance issues at this stage is much more preferable to spotting them after they’ve gone live. I think about this type of performance all the time when I’m working on a team, although I’ve never had a name for it. I guess what I’m always thinking about is how can we introduce front-end engineers into the design process as early as possible? I’ve found that the final product is much more performant in when front-end engineers and designers brainstorm solutions together. Perhaps collaborating on a performance checklist is a good place to start? Direct Link to Article — Permalink The post The Three Types of Performance Testing appeared first on CSS-Tricks....

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How to stop using console.log() and start using your browser’s debugger

Whenever I see someone really effectively debug JavaScript in the browser, they use the DevTools tooling to do it. Setting breakpoints and hopping over them and such. That, as opposed to sprinkling console.log() (and friends) statements all around your code. Parag Zaveri wrote about the transition and it has clearly resonated with lots of folks! (7.5k claps on Medium as I write). I know I have hangups about it… Part of debugging is not just inspecting code once as-is; it’s inspecting stuff, making changes and then continuing to debug. If I spend a bunch of time setting up breakpoints, will they still be there after I’ve changed my code and refreshed? Answer: DevTools appears to do a pretty good job with that. Looking at the console to see some output is one thing, but mucking about in the Sources panel is another. My code there might be transpiled, combined, and not quite look like my authored code, making things harder to find. Plus it’s a bit cramped in there, visually. But yet! It’s so powerful. Setting a breakpoint (just by clicking a line number) means that I don’t have to litter my own code with extra junk, nor do I have to choose what to log. Every variable in local and global scope is available for me to look at that breakpoint. I learned in Parag’s article that you...

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Understanding the difference between grid-template and grid-auto

Ire Aderinokun: Within a grid container, there are grid cells. Any cell positioned and sized using the grid-template-* properties forms part of the explicit grid. Any grid cell that is not positioned/sized using this property forms part of the implicit grid instead. Understanding explicit grids and implicit grids is powerful. This is my quicky take: Explicit: you define a grid and place items exactly where you want them to go. Implicit: you define a grid and let items fall into it as they can. Grids can be both! Direct Link to Article — Permalink The post Understanding the difference between grid-template and grid-auto appeared first on CSS-Tricks....

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8 Tips for Great Code Reviews

Kelly Sutton with good advice on code reviews. Hard to pick a favorite. I like all the stuff about minding your tone and getting everyone involved, but I also think the computerization stuff is important: If a computer can decide and enforce a rule, let the computer do it. Arguing spaces vs. tabs is not a productive use of human time. Re: Tip #6: it’s pretty cool when the tools you use can help with that, like this new GitHub feature where code suggestions can turn into a commit. Direct Link to Article — Permalink The post 8 Tips for Great Code Reviews appeared first on CSS-Tricks....

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Did we get anywhere on that :nth-letter() thing?

No, not really. I tried to articulate a need for it in 2011 in A Call for ::nth-everything. Jeremy takes a fresh look at this here in 2018, noting that the first published desire for this was 15 years ago. All the same use cases still exist now, but perhaps slightly more, since web typography has come along way since then. Our desire to do more (and hacks to make it happen) are all the greater. I seem to recall the main reason we don’t have these things isn’t necessarily the expected stuff like layout paradoxes, but rather the different typed languages of the world. As in, there are languages in which single characters are words and text starts in different places and runs in different directions. The meaning of “first” and “line” might get nebulous in a way specs don’t like. Direct Link to Article — Permalink The post Did we get anywhere on that :nth-letter() thing? appeared first on CSS-Tricks....

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