Select Page

Category: Link

Custom Elements Everywhere

Custom Elements Everywhere is a site created by Rob Dodson. It displays the results of a set of tests that check JS frameworks that use Custom Elements and Shadow DOM for interoperability issues. It could look like a report card at first glance, but the description at the top of the site nicely sums up the goal of comparing frameworks: This project runs a suite of tests against each framework to identify interoperability issues, and highlight potential fixes already implemented in other frameworks. If frameworks agree on how they will communicate with Custom Elements, it makes developers’ jobs easier; they can author their elements to meet these expectations. Nice! Consensus and consistency are exactly what Custom Elements needs in light of the official spec being in working draft and the surge in JS frameworks using them. Direct Link to Article — Permalink Custom Elements Everywhere is a post from CSS-Tricks...

Read More

Problem space

Speaking of utility libraries, Jeremy Keith responded to Adam Wathan’s article that we linked to not long ago. Jeremey is with him through the first four “phases”, but can’t come along for phase 5, the one about going all-in on utility libraries: At this point there is no benefit to even having an external stylesheet. You may as well use inline styles. Ah, but Adam has anticipated this and counters with this difference between inline styles and having utility classes for everything: You can’t just pick any value want; you have to choose from a curated list. Right. But that isn’t a technical solution, it’s a cultural one. You could just as easily have a curated list of allowed inline style properties and values. If you are in an environment where people won’t simply create a new utility class every time they want to style something, then you are also in an environment where people won’t create new inline style combinations every time they want to style something. I think Adam has hit on something important here, but it’s not about utility classes. His suggestion of “utility-first CSS” will only work if the vocabulary is strictly adhered to. For that to work, everyone touching the code needs to understand the system and respect the boundaries of it. Direct Link to Article — Permalink Problem space is a post from...

Read More

A Book Apart

(This is a sponsored post.) You know A Book Apart! They’ve published all kinds of iconic books in our field. They are short and to the point. The kind of book you can read in a single flight. I wrote on not so long ago called Practical SVG. Fortunately for us both, SVG isn’t the most fast-moving technology out there, so reading this book now and using what you learn is just as useful now as it ever was. More interested in JavaScript, they got it. HTML? CSS? Typography? Responsive Design? All covered. In fact, you should probably just browse the library yourself, or get them all. Better still, now is the time to do it, because 15% of all sales will directly benefit those affected by Hurrican Harvey. Direct Link to Article — Permalink A Book Apart is a post from CSS-Tricks...

Read More

Managing CSS & JS in an HTTP/2 World

Trevor Davis on how we’ll link up CSS when we go all-in on HTTP/2: This is the opposite of what we have done as best practice for years now. But in order to take advantage of multiplexing, it’s best to break up your CSS into smaller files so that only the necessary CSS is loaded on each page. An example page markup would look something like this: ... ... This idea shares some DNA with Critical CSS. Loading CSS with is blocking, so load as little of it as you can right away and load the rest of it as you need it. There is no penalty for loading the stylesheets individually because of HTTP/2 multiplexing, and loading them right before the HTML that uses them actually takes advantage of the blocking by not allowing the rendering of the HTML before the CSS for it is gotten. Plus you’ll be able to break cache on these smaller bits of CSS as needed, just bear in mind it might not compress as well. The thing is… for any browser that doesn’t support HTTP/2 (e.g. IE 10, Opera mobile/mini, UC browser), while this technique will still work, it will be pretty bad for performance. This will be an easier call to make on projects that don’t need to support those browsers for whatever reason. Direct Link to Article — Permalink Managing...

Read More

Cross Browser Testing with CrossBrowserTesting

(This is a sponsored post.) Say you do your development work on a Mac, but you’d like to test out some designs in Microsoft Edge, which doesn’t have macOS version. Or vice versa! You work on a PC and you need to test on Safari, which no longer makes a Windows version. It’s a classic problem, and one I’ve been dealing with for a decade. I remember buying a copy of Windows Vista, buying software to manage virtual machines, and spending days just getting a testing environment set up. You can still go down that road, if you, ya...

Read More
000webhost logo