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Web Animation Workshops Dates for 2018 Announced

“I’m getting a raise!” This was my favorite quote from last year’s Web Animation Workshops, as Val and I covered performance, tooling, and creating animations for SVG, CSS, JS and React. Now we’re gearing up for another round of Web Animation Workshops in 2018! But we’re only offering two workshops this time since both of us have moved away from full-time consulting. The aim of these workshops is to level up your animation skills in just two days and equip you with a full understanding of animation concepts without having to rely on copying and pasting code from other people in your web applications. These are the dates and locations: Chicago: March 19 – 20 Brighton, UK: July 9 – 10 We’re already out of early bird tickets for Chicago and space is limited, so grab yours quickly before they sell out. We’ll see you there! Direct Link to Article — Permalink Web Animation Workshops Dates for 2018 Announced is a post from CSS-Tricks...

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Stimulus

A modest JavaScript framework for the HTML you already have. This will appeal to anyone who is apprehensive about JavaScript being required to generate HTML, yet wants a modern framework to help with modern problems, like state management. I wonder if this would be a good answer for things like WordPress or CraftCMS themes that are designed to be server side but, like any site, could benefit from client-side JavaScript enhancements. Stimulus isn’t really built to handle SPAs, but instead pair with Turbolinks. That way, you’re still changing out page content with JavaScript, but all the routing and HTML generation is server side. Kinda old school meets new school. Direct Link to Article — Permalink Stimulus is a post from CSS-Tricks...

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PixelSnap

Forever I’ve used the macOS Command-Shift-4 screenshot utility to measure things. Pressing it gets you a little crosshairs cursor which you can click-and-drag to take a screenshot but, crucially, has little numbers that tell you the width/height of the selection in pixels. It’s crude, but ever so useful. See those teeny-tiny numbers in the bottom-right? So useful, even if they are tough to read. PixelSnap is one of those apps that, once you see it, you’re like OMG that’s the best idea ever. It’s the same kind of interaction (key command, then mouse around), but it’s drawing lines between...

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Sketching in the Browser

Mark Dalgleish details how his team at seek tried to build a library of React components that could then be translated into Sketch documents. Why is that important though? Well, Mark describes the problems that his team faced like this: …most design systems still have a fundamental flaw. Designers and developers continue to work in entirely different mediums. As a result, without constant, manual effort to keep them in sync, our code and design assets are constantly drifting further and further apart. For companies working with design systems, it seems our industry is stuck with design tools that are essentially built for the wrong medium—completely unable to feed our development work back into the next round of design. Mark then describes how his team went ahead and open-sourced html-sketchapp-cli, a command line tool for converting HTML documents into Sketch components. The idea is that this will ultimately save everyone from having to effectively copy and paste styles from the React components back to Sketch and vice-versa. Looks like this is the second major stab at the React to Sketch. The last one that went around was AirBnB’s React Sketch.app. We normally think of the end result of design tooling being the code, so it’s fascinating to see people finding newfound value in moving the other direction. Direct Link to Article — Permalink Sketching in the Browser is a post...

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Designer-Oriented Styles

James Kyle: Components are a designer’s bread and butter. Designers have been building design systems with some model of “component” for a really long time. As the web has matured, from Atomic Design to Sketch Symbols, “components” (in some form or another) have asserted themselves as a best practice for web designers … Designers don’t care about selectors or #TheCascade. They might make use of it since it’s available, but #TheCascade never comes up in the design thought process. (Okay okay… most designers. You’re special. But we both knew that already.) I think James makes strong points here. I’m, predictably, in the camp in which I like CSS. I don’t find it particularly hard or troublesome. Yet, I don’t think in CSS when designing. Much easier to think (and work) in components, nesting them as needed. If the developer flow matched that, that’s cool. I also agree with Sarah Federman who chimed in on Twitter: It seems a bit premature to look at the current landscape of component CSS tooling at say that it’s designer-friendly. The whole conversation is worth reading, ending with: Tooling that treats component design as an interface with the code is where it’s at/going to be. Hopefully, designers will be more empowered to create component styles when we can meet them closer to their comfort zone. Direct Link to Article — Permalink Designer-Oriented Styles is...

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