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Category: Link

CSS: A New Kind of JavaScript

In this wacky and satirical post, Heydon Pickering describes a wild new technology called Cascading Style Sheets that solves a lot of the problems you might bump into when styling things with JavaScript: A good sign that a technology is not fit for purpose is how much we have to rely on workarounds and best practices to get by. Another sign is just how much code we have to write in order to get simple things done. When it comes to styling, JavaScript is that technology. CSS solves JavaScript’s styling problems, and elegantly. The question is: are you willing to embrace the change, or are you married to an inferior methodology? Yes, this is a funny post but the topic of CSS-in-JS is hot and quite active. We recently shared a video of Bruce Lawson’s excellent talk on the subject and published a roundup of chatter about it as it relates to React. Chris also linked the conversation back to the age-old question of how we deal with unused CSS. Direct Link to Article — Permalink The post CSS: A New Kind of JavaScript appeared first on CSS-Tricks....

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What bit of advice would you share with someone new to your field?

The most FA of all the FAQs. Here’s Laura Kalbag: Find what you love. Don’t worry about needing to learn every language, technique or tool. Start with what interests you, and carve your own niche. And then use your powers for good! And my own: Buy a domain name. Figure out how to put an HTML file up there. Isn’t that a powerful feeling? Now you’ve got table stakes. Build something. Definitely, go read other A Book Apart author answers because they are all great. My other favorite is just three words. Direct Link to Article — Permalink The post What bit of advice would you share with someone new to your field? appeared first on CSS-Tricks....

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The div that looks different in every browser

It’s not that Martijn Cuppens used User Agent sniffing, CSS hacks, or anything like that to make this quirk div. This is just a plain ol’ using the outline property a la: div { outline: inset 100px green; outline-offset: -125px; } It looks different in different browsers because browsers literally render something differently in this strange situation. I happened upon Reddit user spidermonk33’s comment in which they animated the offset to understand it a bit more. I took that idea and made this little video to show them behaving even weirder than the snapshots… Direct Link to Article — Permalink The post The div that looks different in every browser appeared first on CSS-Tricks....

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Design Systems at GitHub

Here’s a nifty post by Diana Mounter all about the design systems team at GitHub that details how the team was formed, the problems they’ve faced and how they’ve adapted along the way: When I started working at GitHub in late 2015, I noticed that there were many undocumented patterns, I had to write a lot of new CSS to implement designs, and that there weren’t obvious underlying systems connecting all the pieces together. I knew things could be better and I was enthusiastic about making improvements—I quickly discovered that I wasn’t the only one that felt this way. There were several folks working on efforts to improve things, but weren’t working together. With support from design leads, a group of us started to meet regularly to discuss improvements to Primer and prioritize work—this was the beginnings of the design systems team. This whole post had me nodding furiously along to every word but there was one point that I particularly made note of: the part where Diana mentions how her team decided to make “the status of styles more obvious” in order to communicate changes to the rest of the team. Lately, I’ve noticed how design systems can demonstrate the status of a project, which is super neat. Communicating these large changes to the codebase early and frequently, over-communicating almost, is probably a good idea when a design...

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itty.bitty

Mark this down as one of the strangest things I’ve seen in a good long while. Nicholas Jitkoff has made a tool called itty.bitty that creates websites with all of the assets being contained within their own link. You can create a website without any HTML or CSS resources at all because it’s all been base64 encoded into the URL itself. Take this crazy looking URL, for example: https://itty.bitty.site/#How_it_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 This link contains all of the HTML and CSS that makes up the website. The really cool thing about this is that you don’t need a server to make an itty.bitty site — once you paste the link above into the browser it’ll fetch some code from the itty bitty domain then extract and inflate the data from there. I’m not entirely sure how useful this is but it’s certainly a novel concept to me! Go ahead and start making your own itty.bitty sites. Direct Link to Article — Permalink The post itty.bitty appeared first on CSS-Tricks....

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