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Editing the W3C HTML5 spec

Bruce Lawson has been tapped to co-edit the W3C HTML5 spec and, in his announcement post, clarified the difference between that and the WHATWG spec: The WHATWG spec is a future-facing document; lots of ideas are incubated there. The W3C spec is a snapshot of what works interoperably – authors who don’t care much about what may or may not be round the corner, but who need solid advice on what works now may find this spec easier to use. I was honestly unfamiliar with the WHATWG spec and now I find it super interesting to know there are two working groups pushing HTML forward in distinct but (somewhat) cooperative ways. Kudos to you, Bruce! And, yes, Vive open standards! Direct Link to Article — Permalink Editing the W3C HTML5 spec is a post from CSS-Tricks...

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Declining Complexity in CSS

The fourth edition of Eric Meyer and Estelle Weyl’s CSS: The Definitive Guide was recently released. The new book weighs in at 1,016 pages, which is up drastically from 447 in the third edition, which was up slightly from 436 in the second edition. Despite the appearance of CSS needing more pages to capture more complicated concepts, Eric suggests that CSS is actually easier to grasp than ever before and its complexity has actually declined between editions: But the core principles and mechanisms are no more complicated than they were a decade or even two decades ago. If anything, they’re easier to grasp now, because we don’t have to clutter our minds with float behaviors or inline layout just to try to lay out a page. Flexbox and Grid (chapters 12 and 13, by the way) make layout so much simpler than ever before, while simultaneously providing far more capability than ever before. In short, yes, lots of new concepts have been introduced since 2007 when the third edition was released, but they’re solving the need to use layout, err, tricks to make properties bend in ways they were never intended: It’s still an apparent upward trend, but think about all the new features that have come out since the 3rd Edition, or are coming out right now: gradients, multiple backgrounds, sticky positioning, flexbox, Grid, blending, filters, transforms, animation,...

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Styleable

The Wix dev team throws their hat into the CSS preprocessor ring: Stylable is a CSS preprocessor that enables you to write reusable, highly-performant, styled components. Each component exposes a style API that maps its internal parts so you can reuse components across teams without sacrificing stylability. Scopes styles to components so they don’t “leak” and clash with other styles. Enables custom pseudo-classes and pseudo-elements that abstract the internal structure of a component. These can then be styled externally. Uses themes so you can apply different look and feel across your web application. At build time, the preprocessor converts the Stylable CSS into flat, static, valid, vanilla CSS that works cross-browser. Looks like Sass luminary Chris Eppstein is getting in on the game of scoped styles with the not-yet-released CSS Blocks. And think of Vue’s support for , and the popularity of utility libraries. I think scoped styles might be the hottest CSS topic in 2018. Direct Link to Article — Permalink Styleable is a post from CSS-Tricks...

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Live Share / Teletype

Amanda Silver introduces “Visual Studio Live Share”, which: enables developers using Visual Studio 2017 or Visual Studio Code to collaborate in real-time! This goes a bit deeper than just a multiple-cursors thing. Both people get all the same fancy VS code UI stuff like IntelliSense and Peek. GitHub’s Atom editor also has Teletype, which: lets developers share their workspace with team members and collaborate on code in real time. Atom has the concept of a host, in which: As the host moves between files, collaborators follow along with the active tab automatically. I’d be remiss not to mention CodePen has Collab Mode and Professor Mode, which require zero setup. Shoot someone a URL and go! Direct Link to Article — Permalink Live Share / Teletype is a post from CSS-Tricks...

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Discover The Fatwigoo

When you use a bit of inline and you don’t set height and width, but you do set a viewBox, that’s a fitwigoo. I love the name. The problem with fatwigoo’s is that the will size itself like a block-level element, rendering enormously until the CSS comes in and (likely) has sizing rules to size it into place. It’s one of those things where if you develop with pretty fast internet, you might not ever see it. But if you’re somewhere where the internet is slow or has high latency (or if you’re Karl Dubost and literally block CSS), you’ll probably see it all the time. I was an offender before I learned how obnoxious this is. At first, it felt weird to size things in HTML rather than CSS. My solution now is generally to leave sensible defaults on inline SVG (probably icons) like height="20" width="20" and still do my actual sizing in CSS. Direct Link to Article — Permalink Discover The Fatwigoo is a post from CSS-Tricks...

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