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IBM Plex

Here’s a free new font for IBM Plex, a family of typefaces by the iconic company of the same name. It’s on Google Fonts if you want to use it. And we’re talking about a multifaceted font. It touts having: Roman and Italics Four subfamilies Eight weights Support for 100 languages The site promoting the font is noteworthy in and of itself. It’s been designed to showcase how the typefaces were built as a single, complex system and tells the story in interactive sections using a parallax effect. Even if you’re not a big fan of the typefaces themselves (although I certainly am), it’s still super interesting to see how they visually describe the challenges they faced when in the design process. There’s lots of weird and interesting UI things going on here. If you love news about companies making their own fonts, there have been a few others lately like U.S. Soccer’s 90 Minutes and Netflix Sans. Direct Link to Article — Permalink The post IBM Plex appeared first on CSS-Tricks....

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w descriptors and sizes: Under the hood

Eric Portis digs into how the browser decides which image to downloads when you give it . Notably, a browser can do whatever it wants: Intentionally un-specified behavior lets browsers provide innovative answers to an open-ended question. Still, calculations happens based on what you give it and you can still do a good job with that part. The very weirdest part about all this is that the sizes attribute can alter an images “natural width”, which can lead to unexpected upscaling, a thing we’re trained to loathe. If you’re in that situation, you can either… use an inline width attribute set an inline style with a max-width embrace it and juoccasionalth occassinal upscaling Direct Link to Article — Permalink The post w descriptors and sizes: Under the hood appeared first on CSS-Tricks....

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A DevTools for Designers

There has long been an unfortunate disconnect between visual design for the web and web design and development. We’re over here designing pictures of websites, not websites – so the sentiment goes. A.J. Kandy puts a point on all this. We’re seeing a proliferation of design tools these days, all with their own leaps forward. Yet… But, critically, the majority of them aren’t web-centric. None really integrate with a modern web development workflow, not without converters or plugins anyway; and their output is not websites, but clickable simulations of websites. Still, these prototypes are, inevitably, one-way artifacts that have to be first analyzed by developers, then recreated in code. That’s just a part of what A.J. has to say, so I’d encourage you to read the whole thing. Do y’all get Clearletter, the Clearleft newsletter? It’s a good one. They made some connections here to nearly a decade of similar thinking: Jason Santa Maria: A Real Web Design Application Jeffrey Zeldman: An Indesign for HTML and CSS? Jon Gold: The Evolution of Tools I suspect the reason that nobody has knocked a solution out of the park is that it’s a really hard problem to solve. There might not be a solution that is universally loved across lines. Like A.J., I hope it happens in the browser. Direct Link to Article — Permalink The post A DevTools for Designers...

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Tracking Uncertainty of Work

Ryan Singer writes about project and time management issues that I’ve been experiencing lately. He describes two states of every project: uncertainty and certainty, or “figuring things out” and “making it happen.” Ryan describes it like this: Work is like a hill with two sides. There’s an uphill phase of figuring out what to do and how to approach the problem. That’s the climb. After you reach the top, there aren’t anybody [sic] ruinous unknowns. You can see down to the other side and finish executing. It’s straightforward to estimate and finish the work from that point. As far as I see it, the hardest thing about the first half of every project is making sure that everyone on a team is communicating constantly as tiny design decisions can have enormous, cascading effects on an engineer. I think that’s something I’ve always struggled with since I just want to get to the “making it happen” part as soon as humanly possible. It also goes back to something Geoff wrote a little while back about setting good expectations before and during the project process. Direct Link to Article — Permalink The post Tracking Uncertainty of Work appeared first on CSS-Tricks....

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Compressive Images Revisited

Tim Kadlec returns to the topic of how to make images on the web as performant as possible and looks at the technique called “Compressive Images” which is now not recommended for a bunch of reasons. Tim summarizes his point here: By now the trade-off is pretty clear. Compressive images give us a reduced file size, but it greatly increases the memory footprint. Thanks to the standards that have been developed around responsive images, it’s a trade-off we no longer need to make. If you’re interested in learning more then it’s hard not to recommend Jason Grigsby’s masterclass called Responsive Images 101, too. Direct Link to Article — Permalink The post Compressive Images Revisited appeared first on CSS-Tricks....

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