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An Almost Ideal React Image Component

Yes, this is a React component, but regardless if you care about that part or not, the “ideal image component” part could be of interest. There is a lot to consider with how we put images on web pages these days. This deals with: Placeholder space (and then flexible responsive styles after loading) Low-quality placeholder images Responsive images syntax (srcset) Image formats (e.g. using WebP when you can) Click-to-load on bad network connections Better UX for loading errors, with translatable copy That’s not even all of it. So much to think about with poor little . I enjoyed Alejandro Sanchez’s response: The readme file for this component is amazing to teach you how to think like a front-end developer. — Alejandro Sanchez (@alesanchezr) June 12, 2018 Direct Link to Article — Permalink The post An Almost Ideal React Image Component appeared first on CSS-Tricks....

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World wide wrist

After all the hubbub with WWDC over the past couple of days, Ethan Marcotte is excited about the news that the Apple Watch will be able to view web content. He writes: If I had to guess, I’d imagine some sort of “reader mode” is coming to the Watch: in other words, when you open a link on your Watch, this minified version of WebKit wouldn’t act like a full browser. Instead of rendering all your scripts, styles, and layout, mini-WebKit would present a stripped-down version of your web page. If that’s the case, then Jen Simmons’s suggestion is spot-on: it just got a lot more important to design from a sensible, small screen-friendly document structure built atop semantic HTML. But who knows! I could be wrong! Maybe it’s a more capable browser than I’m assuming, and we’ll start talking about best practices for layout, typography, and design on watches. I had this inkling for a long while that there wouldn’t ever be a browser in the Watch due to its constraints, but instead I hoped that there might be a surge of methods to read web content aloud via some sort of voice interface. “Siri, read me the latest post from James’ blog,” is probably nightmare fuel for most people but I was sort of holding out for devices like this to access the web via audio. Another...

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The web can be anything we want it to be

I really enjoyed this chat between Bruce Lawson and Mustafa Kurtuldu where they talked about browser support and the health of the web. Bruce expands upon a lot of the thoughts in a post he wrote last year called World Wide Web, Not Wealthy Western Web where he writes: …across the world, regardless of disposable income, regardless of hardware or network speed, people want to consume the same kinds of goods and services. And if your websites are made for the whole world, not just the wealthy Western world, then the next 4 billion people might consume the stuff that your organization makes. Another highlight is where Bruce also mentions that, as web developers, we might think that we’ve all moved on from jQuery as a community, and yet there are still millions of websites that depend upon jQuery to function properly. It’s an interesting anecdote and relevant to recent discussions about React making a run at being the next thing to replace jQuery: I’m just gonna throw this bomb here: React is the new jQuery There you go. — Sara Soueidan (@SaraSoueidan) May 24, 2018 However! The most interesting part of this particular discussion, for me at least, is where they talk about Flash and the impact it had on the design of CSS3 and HTML5. They both argue that despite Flash’s shortcomings and accessibility issues, it happened...

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Frustration

Jeremy Keith talks about a couple of recent frustrating moments in his life. One regarding a musical instrument, one involving a build process: That feeling of frustration I get from having wiring issues with a musical instrument is the same feeling I get whenever something goes awry with my web server. I know just enough about servers to be dangerous. When something goes wrong, I feel very out of my depth, and again, I have no idea how long it will take the fix the problem: minutes, hours, days, or weeks. I echo his later sentiment that moments like these become great writing opportunities. I’d say that it’s always OK to experience frustration. It doesn’t make you a lesser developer, at any level. But at the same time, the more experienced of a developer you become, less things will trigger that frustration, because of the resources you’ve built up to deal with those situations. Notice Jeremy didn’t give up and a co-worker came to the rescue. Direct Link to Article — Permalink The post Frustration appeared first on CSS-Tricks....

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Developing a design environment

Jules Forrest discusses some of the work that her team at Credit Karma has been up to when it comes to design systems. Jules writes: …in most engineering organizations, you spend your whole first day setting up your development environment so you can actually ship code. It’s generally pretty tedious and no one likes doing it, but it’s this thing you do to contribute meaningful work to production. Which got me thinking, what would it look like to make it easier for designers to design for production? That’s what Jules calls a “design environment” and she’s even written a...

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