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Category: Link

modern-normalize

Another don’t call it a reset from Sindre Sorhus. It’s a port of Normalize that, as the name suggests, is modernized to remove some of the older stuff and add a few opinionated bits. I’m good with light sensible opinions, like in this case, box-sizing: border-box; everywhere. This looks similar to sanitize.css which is also based on Normalize and brings a few more sensible opinions. Same with Reboot. If you’re interested in some of the history and thinking behind these things, I wrote about that not long ago. Daniel Box made a little tool to compare them and I forked it to include modern-normalize. Direct Link to Article — Permalink modern-normalize is a post from CSS-Tricks...

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The Red Reveal: Illusions on the Web

In part one of a series of posts about optical illusions on the web, Dan Wilson looks at how to create the “Red Reveal” that he happens to describe like this: Growing up, my family played a lot of board games. Several games such as Outburst, Password, and Clue Jr. included something that amazed me at the time — a red lens and cards with some light blue text that was obscured by a myriad of red lines. When you put the red lens over the card, the text would magically appear. Here’s one example of that effect from...

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Shipping system fonts to GitHub.com

System font stacks got hot about a year ago, no doubt influenced by Mark Otto’s work putting them live on GitHub. The why, to me, feels like (1) yay performance and (2) the site looks like the rest of the operating system. But to Mark: Helvetica was created in 1957 when the personal computer was a pipe dream. Arial was created in 1982 and is available on 95% of computers across the web. Millions, if not billions, of web pages currently use this severely dated font stack to serve much younger content to much younger browsers and devices. As display quality improves, so too must our use of those displays. System fonts like Apple’s San Francisco and Microsoft’s Segoe aim to do just that, taking advantage of retina screens, dynamic kerning, additional font-weights, and improved readability. If operating systems can take advantage of these changes, so too can our CSS. I also like the team’s idea of adding emoji fonts at the end of the font declaration so that you have the best support possible for those too: p { font-family: -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, "Segoe UI", Roboto, Oxygen, Ubuntu, Cantarell, "Fira Sans", "Droid Sans", "Helvetica Neue", Arial, sans-serif, "Apple Color Emoji", "Segoe UI Emoji", "Segoe UI Symbol"; } Direct Link to Article — Permalink Shipping system fonts to GitHub.com is a post from CSS-Tricks...

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​Wix.com: Make the Web Your Playground

(This is a sponsored post.) Here’s something you should consider having: your own professional website. The only thing you’ll need to get started is your imagination, a little free time, and an innovative website builder. Wix is the world’s most technologically advanced website builder. Sign up for Wix, choose a template, and start customizing it. Whether you’re a novice, a business owner, a sophisticated designer, or a professional website builder, you’ll have full control of your website – from design prototyping to production. Wix takes care of all the heavy lifting. You get reliable, safe, secure hosting that you’ll...

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Observable

Observable launched a couple of weeks ago. As far as I understand, it’s sort of like a mix between CodePen and Medium where you create “notebooks” for exploring data, making nifty visualizations. Check out this collection of visualizations using map integrations as an example. The entries are not only nice demos of the libraries or technology being used (i.e. D3, Google Maps, Leaflet, etc.), but also make for some interesting infographics in themselves. In a note about this interesting new format, founder Mike Bostock describes a notebook as “an interactive, editable document defined by code. It’s a computer program, but one that’s designed to be easier to read and write by humans.” All of this stuff riffs on a lot of Mike’s previous work which is definitely worth exploring further if you’re a fan of complex visualizations on the web. Direct Link to Article — Permalink Observable is a post from CSS-Tricks...

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