Select Page

Category: CSS

That Time I Tried Browsing the Web Without CSS

CSS is what gives every website its design. Websites sure aren’t very fun and friendly without it! I’ve read about somebody going a week without JavaScript and how the experience resulted in websites that were faster, though certain aspects of them would not function as expected. But CSS. Turning off CSS while browsing the web wouldn’t exactly make the web far less usable… right? Or, like JavaScript, would some features not work as expected? Out of curiosity, I decided to give it a whirl and rip the CSS flesh off the HTML skeleton while browsing a few sites. Why, you might ask? Are there any non-masochistic reasons for turning off CSS? Heydon Pickering once tweeted that disabling CSS is a good way to check some accessibility standards: Common elements like headings, lists, and form controls are semantic and still look good. A visual hierarchy is still established with default styles. The content can still be read in a logical order. Images still exist as tags rather than getting lost as CSS backgrounds. A WebAIM survey from 2018 reported that 12.5% of users who rely on any sort of assisted technology browse the web with custom stylesheets, which can include doing away with every CSS declaration across a site. And, if we’re talking about slow internet connections, ditching CSS could be one way to consume content faster. There’s also the...

Read More

Slice and Dice a Disc with CSS

I recently came across an interesting sliced disc design. The disc had a diagonal gradient and was split into horizontal slices, offset a bit from left to right. Naturally, I started to think what would the most efficient way of doing it with CSS be. Sliced gradient disc. The first thought was that this should be doable with border-radius, right? Well, no! The thing with border-radius is that it creates an elliptical corner whose ends are tangent to the edges it joins. My second thought was to use a circle() clipping path. Well, turns out this solution works like...

Read More

What’s New In CSS?

Rachel hooks us up with what the CSS Working Group is talking about: Styling scrollbars. This would come with properties like scrollbar-width and scrollbar-color. The best we have right now is proprietary WebKit stuff. Aspect ratios. I imagine the CSS portion of this journey will be best handled if it plays nicely with the HTML intrinsicsize stuff. Matching without specificity. :where() is :matches() with no specificity, and :matches() may become :is(). Logical Properties shorthand. The team is discussing a shorthand syntax for Logical Properties and the possibility logical would be default over the current physical with a defined “mode” in the stylesheet. Direct Link to Article — Permalink The post What’s New In CSS? appeared first on CSS-Tricks....

Read More

Using feature detection to write CSS with cross-browser support

In early 2017, I presented a couple of workshops on the topic of CSS feature detection, titled CSS Feature Detection in 2017. A friend of mine, Justin Slack from New Media Labs, recently sent me a link to the phenomenal Feature Query Manager extension (available for both Chrome and Firefox), by Nigerian developer Ire Aderinokun. This seemed to be a perfect addition to my workshop material on the subject. However, upon returning to the material, I realized how much my work on the subject has aged in the last 18 months. The CSS landscape has undergone some tectonic shifts:...

Read More

A Sliding Nightmare: Understanding the Range Input

You may have already seen a bunch of tutorials on how to style the range input. While this is another article on that topic, it’s not about how to get any specific visual result. Instead, it dives into browser inconsistencies, detailing what each does to display that slider on the screen. Understanding this is important because it helps us have a clear idea about whether we can make our slider look and behave consistently across browsers and which styles are necessary to do so. Looking inside a range input Before anything else, we need to make sure the browser...

Read More
  • 1
  • 2
www.000webhost.com