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Category: chrome

Control the Internet With Chrome Extensions!

As a web UI developer and designer, there are countless things to learn and only so many hours in the day. There are topics I’ve purposefully avoided, like mobile and offline application development because, at some point, you have to draw a line somewhere in the millions of shiny new topics and get some work done. One of the areas I’ve avoided in the past is browser extension development. I didn’t understand how they worked, what the development environment was, or how permissions interacted with overriding pages because, frankly, I didn’t think I was interested. Then one day, my...

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New mobile Chrome feature would disable scripts on slow connections

This is a possible upcoming feature for mobile Chrome: If a Data Saver user is on a 2G-speed or slower network according to the NetInfo API, Chrome disables scripts and sends an intervention header on every resource request. Users are shown a UI at the bottom of the screen indicating the page has been modified to save data. Users can enable scripts on the page by tapping “Show original” in the UI. And the people shout: progressive enhancement! Jeremy Keith: An excellent idea for people in low-bandwidth situations: automatically disable JavaScript. As long as the site is built with progressive enhancement, there’s no problem (and if not, the user is presented with the choice to enable scripts). Power to the people! This reminds me of the importance of a very useful building strategy called “Progressive Enhancement” 👀 🙌🏻 https://t.co/H4KHu9AzZC — Sara Soueidan (@SaraSoueidan) August 27, 2018 Did you bet on JavaScript or are you gambling with JavaScript?https://t.co/uYULr5F9oj — Zach Leatherman (@zachleat) August 27, 2018 George Burduli reports: This is huge news for developing countries where mobile data packets may cost a lot and are not be affordable to all. Enabling NoScript by default will make sure that users don’t burn through their data without knowledge. The feature will probably be available in the Chrome 69, which will also come with the new Material Design refresh. The post New mobile...

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The Ecological Impact of Browser Diversity

Early in my career when I worked at agencies and later at Microsoft on Edge, I heard the same lament over and over: “Argh, why doesn’t Edge just run on Blink? Then I would have access to ALL THE APIs I want to use and would only have to test in one browser!” Let me be clear: an Internet that runs only on Chrome’s engine, Blink, and its offspring, is not the paradise we like to imagine it to be. As a Google Developer Expert who has worked on Microsoft Edge, with Firefox, and with the W3C as an...

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Better rendering for variable fonts

I was messing around with a variable font the other day and noticed this weird rendering issue in the latest version of Chrome where certain parts of letterforms were clipping into each other in a really weird way. Thankfully, though, Stephen Nixon has come to the rescue with a temporary hack to fix the issue which using a text-shadow on the text that’s using the variable font: .variable-font { text-shadow: 0 0 0 #000; /* text color goes last here */ } Once you do that, you shouldn’t be able to see those weird clip marks in the letterforms anymore. Yeah, it feels pretty hacky but I’m sure this rendering bug will be fixed relatively soon. It doesn’t look like it affects other browsers, as far as I can tell. Direct Link to Article — Permalink The post Better rendering for variable fonts appeared first on CSS-Tricks....

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Chrome is Not the Standard

Chris Krycho has written an excellent post about how us fickle web developers might sometimes confuse features that land in one browser as being “the future of the web.” However, Chris argues that there’s more than one browser’s vision of the web that we should care about: No single company gets to dominate the others in terms of setting the agenda for the web. Not Firefox, with its development and advocacy of WebAssembly, dear to my heart though that is. Not Microsoft and the IE/Edge team, with its proposal of the CSS grid spec in 2011, sad though I am that it languished for as long as it did. Not Apple, with its pitch for concurrent JavaScript. And not—however good its developer relations team is—Chrome, with any of the many ideas it’s constantly trying out, including PWAs. It’s also worth recognizing how these decisions aren’t, in almost any case, unalloyed pushes for “the future of the web.” They reflect business priorities, just like any other technical prioritization. I particularly like Chris’ last point about business priorities because I think it’s quite easy to forget that browser manufacturers aren’t making the web a better place out of sheer kindness; they’re companies with investors and incentives that might not always align with other companies’ objectives. Direct Link to Article — Permalink Chrome is Not the Standard is a post from CSS-Tricks...

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