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Category: browser

Safari Ripper ☠️

Security researcher Sabri posted a bit of code that will “force restart any iOS device.” It’s interesting to see HTML & CSS have this kind of dangerous power. It’s essentially a ton of s scaled to be pretty huge and then set over a repeating JPG image with each blurring the background via backdrop-filter. It must cause such extreme and unhandled memory usage that it wreaks havoc on the browser as well as the entire operating system. I was trying to test it out myself and be really careful not to execute it… but of course I did, and it crashed my Chrome 68 on a MacBook Pro. Not the whole operating system, but I had to force quit the browser. Then again, I suppose even while(true) {} can do that! The comment thread on the gist hast more interesting details, like how it crashes iOS Safari 9+ (including the new version 12!) and weird behavior on the PlayStation 3 native browser. Direct Link to Article — Permalink The post Safari Ripper ☠️ appeared first on CSS-Tricks....

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The Ecological Impact of Browser Diversity

Early in my career when I worked at agencies and later at Microsoft on Edge, I heard the same lament over and over: “Argh, why doesn’t Edge just run on Blink? Then I would have access to ALL THE APIs I want to use and would only have to test in one browser!” Let me be clear: an Internet that runs only on Chrome’s engine, Blink, and its offspring, is not the paradise we like to imagine it to be. As a Google Developer Expert who has worked on Microsoft Edge, with Firefox, and with the W3C as an...

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Browser painting and considerations for web performance

The process of a web browser turning HTML, CSS, and JavaScript into a finished visual representation is quite complex and involves a good bit of magic. Here’s a simplified set of steps the browser goes through: Browser creates the DOM and CSSOM. Browser creates the render tree, where the DOM and styles from the CSSOM are taken into account (display: none elements are avoided). Browser computes the geometry of the layout and its elements based on the render tree. Browser paints pixel by pixel to create the visual representation we see on the screen. In this article, I’d like...

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A Short History of WaSP and Why Web Standards Matter

In August of 2013, Aaron Gustafson posted to the WaSP blog. He had a bittersweet message for a community that he had helped lead: Thanks to the hard work of countless WaSP members and supporters (like you), Tim Berners-Lee’s vision of the web as an open, accessible, and universal community is largely the reality. While there is still work to be done, the sting of the WaSP is no longer necessary. And so it is time for us to close down The Web Standards Project. If there’s just the slightest hint of wistful regret in Gustafson’s message, it’s because...

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A Sliding Nightmare: Understanding the Range Input

You may have already seen a bunch of tutorials on how to style the range input. While this is another article on that topic, it’s not about how to get any specific visual result. Instead, it dives into browser inconsistencies, detailing what each does to display that slider on the screen. Understanding this is important because it helps us have a clear idea about whether we can make our slider look and behave consistently across browsers and which styles are necessary to do so. Looking inside a range input Before anything else, we need to make sure the browser...

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