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Category: Article

Creating a Vue.js Serverless Checkout Form: Stripe Function and Hosting

We’re now in the second post of a four-part series where we’re creating a checkout form application in Vue.js that can accept payments via the Stripe API. In part one, we looked at the concept of serverless functions, set one up in Azure, and connected it to a Stripe account. In this post, we’ll focus on setting up Stripe as a serverless function and hosting it all on Github. Article Series: Setup and Testing Stripe Function and Hosting (This Post) Application and Checkout Component (Coming Soon) Configure the Checkout Component (Coming Soon) First, we’re going write our function and...

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Creating a Vue.js Serverless Checkout Form: Setup and Testing

There comes a time in any young app’s life when it will have to monetize. There are a number of ways to become profitable, but accepting cash is a surefire way to make this more direct. In this four-part tutorial, we’ll go over how to set up a serverless function, make it talk to the Stripe API, and connect it to a checkout form that is setup as a Vue application. This may sound daunting, but it’s actually pretty straightforward! Let’s dig in. Article Series: Setup and Testing (This Post) Stripe Function and Hosting (Coming Soon) Application and Checkout...

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Small Tweaks That Can Make a Huge Impact on Your Website’s Accessibility

For a beginner, accessibility can be daunting. With all of the best intentions in the world, the learning curve to developing compliant, fully accessible websites and apps is huge. It’s also hard to find the right advice, because it’s an ever-changing and increasingly crowded landscape. I’ve written this post to give you some tips on small things that can make a big difference, while hopefully not affecting your development process too much. Let’s dive in! Document Structure and Semantics It probably doesn’t come as much of a surprise that structuring your HTML in an organized, semantic way will make a big difference. Screen readers rely on a well-structured document in order to follow a coherent narrative, so make sure that you’re using the elements that the HTML5 spec provides responsively and effectively. If you’re unsure about how to markup your work correctly, check out resources such as HTML5 Doctor, Code Academy and of course, CSS-Tricks. You can also check out articles like “Writing HTML with accessibility in mind” and “Semantic Structure” to get you going in the right direction. Let’s look at three specific things that can help ensure a well-structured and semantic document. Use a Single Element A good example of building a responsible, semantic document structure is only using one element. This should serve as a signpost for the most important content of the page for your...

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Making CSS Animations Feel More Natural

It used to be that designers designed and coders coded. There was no crossover, and that’s the way it was. But with the advent of CSS transitions and animations, those lines are blurring a bit. It’s no longer as simple as the designer dictating the design and the coder transcribing—designers must now know something about code, and coders must know something about design in order to effectively collaborate. As an example, let’s say a designer asks a developer to make a box bounce. That’s it—no additional instruction. Without some cross-knowledge and a common vocabulary, both sides are a little lost in this communication: the developer doesn’t have enough information to fully realize the designer’s vision, but the designer doesn’t really know what the options are and how to communicate them. With a very basic interpretation, you might end up with something that looks like this: See the Pen Bouncing Box 1 by Brandon Gregory (@pulpexploder) on CodePen. Not very exciting. Although, to be fair, this does meet all of the criteria given. We can definitely do better than this, though. The first thing to look at is the timing function. In the above example, we’re using a linear timing function, which means that the box is constantly moving at the same speed. In some cases, this is desirable; however, in the real world, motion usually doesn’t work like that....

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Thank You (2017 Edition)

As 2017 comes to a close, as we do each year, let’s take a numbers-based glance back at CSS-Tricks. And more importantly, tip our collective hat to all y’all that come here and read the site. We really do think of the site as somewhere you come and read. While a lot of people’s experience with CSS-Tricks is a place that shows up in search results to find the answer to some web design/dev question (and that’s awesome), another way to experience the site is to read it like a magazine. We publish an article (or a couple) nearly...

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