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Creating Vue.js Transitions & Animations

My last two projects hurled me into the JAMstack. SPAs, headless content management, static generation… you name it. More importantly, they gave me the opportunity to learn Vue.js. More than “Build a To-Do App” Vue.js, I got to ship real-life, production-ready Vue apps. The agency behind Snipcart (Spektrum) wanted to start using decoupled JavaScript frameworks for small to medium sites. Before using them on client projects, however, they chose to experiment on themselves. After a few of my peers had unfruitful experiences with React, I was given the green light to prototype a few apps in Vue. This prototyping...

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Reboot, Resets, and Reasoning

I saw in an article by Nicholas Cerminara the other day (careful visiting that link, looks like they have some tracking scripts run wild) that Bootstrap 4 has a new CSS reset baked in they are calling Reboot: Reboot, a collection of element-specific CSS changes in a single file, kickstart Bootstrap to provide an elegant, consistent, and simple baseline to build upon. If you’re new to CSS development, the whole idea of a CSS reset is to deal with styling inconsistencies across browsers. For example, just now I popped a onto a page with no other styling whatsoever. Chrome applies padding: 2px 6px 3px; – Firefox applies padding: 0 8px;. A CSS reset would apply new padding to that element, so that all browsers are consistent about what they apply. There are loads of examples like that. By way of a bit of history… In 2007 Jeff Starr rounded up a bunch of different CSS resets. The oldest one dated is Tantek Çelik’s undohtml.css (that’s a direct link to the source). We can see that the purpose behind it was to strip away default styling. /* undohtml.css */ /* (CC) 2004 Tantek Celik. Some Rights Reserved. */ /* http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0 */ /* This style sheet is licensed under a Creative Commons License. */ /* Purpose: undo some of the default styling of common (X)HTML browsers */ By far, the most...

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5 Tips for Starting a Front-End Refactor

For the last two weeks, I’ve been working on a really large refactor project at Gusto and I realize that this is the first time that a project like this has gone smoothly for me. There haven’t been any kinks in the process, it took about as much time as I thought it would, and no-one appears to be mad at me. In fact, things have gone almost suspiciously well. How did this happen and what was the issue? Well, we had a problem with how our CSS was organized. Some pages in our app loaded Bootstrap and some didn’t. Others were loading only our app styles and some weren’t loading the styles we served from our component library, a separate repo that includes all our forms, buttons, and variables, etc. This led to all sorts of design inconsistencies but most important of all it wasn’t clear how to write CSS in our app. Do the component library styles override Bootstrap? Does Bootstrap override the app styles? It was scary stuff. The goal was a rather complex one then. First, I needed to figure out how our styles were loaded in the app. Second, I wanted to remove Bootstrap from our node_modules and make a new Sass file with all those styles. Third, I then had to remove all our Bootstrap styles and place them into the component library...

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Prettier + Stylelint: Writing Very Clean CSS (Or, Keeping Clean Code is a Two-Tool Game)

It sure is nice having a whole codebase that is perfectly compliant to a set of code style guidelines. All the files use the same indentation, the same quote style, the same spacing and line-break rules, heck, tiny things like the way zero’s in values are handled and how keyframes are named. It seems like a tall order, but these days, it’s easier than ever. It seems to me it’s become a two-tool game: A tool to automatically fix easy-to-fix problems A tool to warn about harder-to-fix problems Half the battle: Prettier Otherwise known as “fix things for me,...

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Getting Nowhere on Job Titles

Last week on ShopTalk, Dave and I spoke with Mandy Michael and Lara Schenck. Mandy had just written the intentionally provocative “Is there any value in people who cannot write JavaScript?” which guided our conversation. Lara is deeply interested in this subject as well, as someone who is a job seeking web worker, but places herself on the spectrum as a non-unicorn. Part of that discussion was about job titles. If there was a ubiquitously accepted and used job title that meant you were specifically skilled at HTML and CSS, and there was a market for that job title,...

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