Select Page

Category: Article

Super-Powered Grid Components with CSS Custom Properties

A little while ago, I wrote a well-received article about combining CSS variables with CSS grid to help build more maintainable layouts. But CSS grid isn’t just for pages! That is a common myth. Although it is certainly very useful for page layout, I find myself just as frequently reaching for grid when it comes to components. In this article I’ll address using CSS grid at the component level. Grid is neither a substitute for flexbox nor vice versa. In fact, using a combination of the two gives us even more power when building components. Building a simple component...

Read More

Using CSS Clip Path to Create Interactive Effects, Part II

This is a follow up to my previous post looking into clip paths. Last time around, we dug into the fundamentals of clipping and how to get started. We looked at some ideas to exemplify what we can do with clipping. We’re going to take things a step further in this post and look at different examples, discuss alternative techniques, and consider how to approach our work to be cross-browser compatible. One of the biggest drawbacks of CSS clipping, at the time of writing, is browser support. Not having 100% browser coverage means different experiences for viewers in different browsers. We, as developers, can’t control what browsers support — browser vendors are the ones who implement the spec and different vendors will have different agendas. One thing we can do to overcome inconsistencies is use alternative technologies. The feature set of CSS and SVG sometimes overlap. What works in one may work in the other and vice versa. As it happens, the concept of clipping exists in both CSS and SVG. The SVG clipping syntax is quite different, but it works the same. The good thing about SVG clipping compared to CSS is its maturity level. Support is good all the way back to old IE browsers. Most bugs are fixed by now (or at least one hope they are). This is what the SVG clipping support looks like:...

Read More

::before vs :before

Note the double-colon ::before versus the single-colon :before. Which one is correct? Technically, the correct answer is ::before. But that doesn’t mean you should automatically use it. The situation is that: double-colon selectors are pseudo-elements. single-colon selectors are pseudo-selectors. ::before is definitely a pseudo-element, so it should use the double colon. The distinction between a pseudo-element and pseudo-selector is already confusing. Fortunately, ::after and ::before are fairly straightforward. They literally add something new to the page, an element. But something like ::first-letter is also a pseudo-element. The way I reason that out in my brain is that it’s selecting a part of something in which there is no existing HTML element for. There is no around that first letter you’re targeting, so that first letter is almost like a new element you’re adding on the page. That differs from pseudo-selectors which are selecting things that already exist, like the :nth-child(2) or whatever. Even though ::before is a pseudo-element and a double-colon is the correct way to use pseudo-elements, should you? There is an argument that perhaps you should use :before, which goes like this: Internet Explorer 8 and below only supported :before, not ::before All modern browsers support it both ways, since tons of sites use :before and browsers really value backwards compatibility. Hey it’s one less character as a bonus. I’ve heard people say that they have a...

Read More

Using feature detection to write CSS with cross-browser support

In early 2017, I presented a couple of workshops on the topic of CSS feature detection, titled CSS Feature Detection in 2017. A friend of mine, Justin Slack from New Media Labs, recently sent me a link to the phenomenal Feature Query Manager extension (available for both Chrome and Firefox), by Nigerian developer Ire Aderinokun. This seemed to be a perfect addition to my workshop material on the subject. However, upon returning to the material, I realized how much my work on the subject has aged in the last 18 months. The CSS landscape has undergone some tectonic shifts:...

Read More

ABeamer: a frame-by-frame animation framework

In a recent post, Zach Saucier demonstrated the awesome things that the DOM allows us to do, thanks to the element. Taking a snapshot of an element and manipulating it to create an exploding animation is pretty slick and a perfect example of how far complex animations have come in the last few years. ABeamer is a new animation ecosystem that takes advantage of these new concepts. At the core of the ecosystem is the web browser animation library. But, it’s not just another animation engine. ABeamer is designed to build frame-by-frame animations in the web browser and use...

Read More
www.000webhost.com