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So, You Wanna Submit a Proposal to Speak at an Event

You’ve been scouring the web for upcoming events. You’ve subscribed to Developer Avocados and you’ve bookmarked conferences.css-tricks.com. And now you’ve found a call for proposals (CFP) that you can’t wait to enter. You quickly fill out the online form and your pinky races towards the Enter button… Stop. Take a deep breath. And move slowly away from the keyboard. As a conference organizer, I’ve gone through hundreds — if not thousands — of speaking proposals. While many are excellent, there are always a bunch that show a profound misunderstanding of the event, audience, and duties of a speaker. These are the ones that immediately get dumped onto the “No Thanks” list on my Trello board. And, as a regular speaker, I’ve learned more than a few things about getting proposals accepted. While there’s no magic bullet for fast tracking your talk, there are a number of habits you can develop and questions you can ask yourself before hitting “submit” to improve your chances of getting invited to events. If you’re a fan of checklists, I’ve put one together to guide you through the process of submitting a proposal. It’s even available on CodePen. 😉 See the Pen The CFP Checklist by Jason Rodriguez (@rodriguezcommaj) on CodePen. Start with some research The first thing before submitting a proposal is to research the heck out of the event. There are a...

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New Course: Three Practical Examples to Learn Vue.js

Want to learn the Vue.js framework by getting your hands dirty with some real-world projects? Try our new course, Three Practical Examples to Learn Vue.js. What You’ll Learn Component-driven web frameworks have revolutionalized front-end web development. With Angular, React, and now Vue.js, it’s easier than ever to write cutting-edge web apps. Vue has a tremendous following, and it’s extremely easy to get started if you know HTML, CSS, and JavaScript. In this course, you’ll learn to build web apps in Vue by following along with three simple examples in the expert hands of Jeremy McPeak. Here are the projects:...

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Inclusively Hidden

Scott O’Hara recently published “Inclusively Hidden,” a nice walkthrough of the different ways to hide things on the web. Nothing is ever cut and dry when it comes to the web! What complicates this is that hidden begs the question: hidden for whom? Different answers to that have different solutions: Hidden for everyone? display: none; or visibility: hidden; or the hidden attribute. (But watch out for that hidden attribute, says Monica Dinculescu.) Hidden visually, but present for assistive tech? A .screen-reader-only class with a smattering of properties to do the job correctly. Hidden for assistive tech, but not visually? The aria-hidden="true" attribute/value. It’s worth grokking all this because it’s is a perfect example of why HTML and CSS is not some easy bolt-on skill for front-end web development. This is critical stuff that isn’t done as correctly as it should be. If you like video, I did one called “Hiding Things with CSS” that goes over a lot of this. As I write this, I’m freshly back from Smashing Conf in San Francisco. Sara Soueidan had a wonderful talk that covered some “hiding things” situations that are even less intuitive than what we might be accustomed to seeing. One thing she covered was the inert attribute and how it can be used to skip interactive elements from keyboard tabbing. It can even be used on a parent element, nullifying...

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Form Input Validation Using Only HTML5 and Regex

Validation of form input is something that should be taken seriously. With luck, nothing worse than garbage data will be submitted to a site which uses data from forms without proper validation. However, there also a chance that hackers will be able to compromise the private data of users who trusted you with their information. Since validation is so important, it makes sense that there are tools and libraries to validate and sanitize data on both the front-end and the back-end. In this tutorial, our focus will be on using the built-in features of HTML5 to validate different kinds of input without...

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Faking env() to Use it Now

There is already an env() function in CSS, but it kinda came out of nowhere as an Apple thing for dealing with “The Notch” but it has made it’s way to be a draft spec. The point will be for UAs or authors to declare variables that cannot be changed. Global const for CSS, sorta. That spec doesn’t seem to suggest how we’ll actually set those env() values just yet. If you want them now, the easiest way to fake them would be using regular ol’ CSS custom properties and simply not change them. But if you want that env() syntax though, there is a PostCSS plugin for emulating it. The way the plugin handles them is through a JavaScript file that declares them. postcssCustomProperties({ importFrom: 'path/to/file.js' /* module.exports = { environmentVariables: { '--branding-padding': '20px', '--branding-small': '600px' } } */ }); Having them start life as JavaScript is interesting, as it means we could perhaps have a single place to set variables that are accessible both to JavaScript and CSS. That’s what Harry Nicholls covers more in his article, “Why you should use CSS env()” like some gotchas when dealing with units and such. But if you really needed a single source for unchangeable variables in both CSS and JavaScript, then I’d say this is a good way to go — and could potentially be ripped out once support...

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